I Caught the Fever of NaNoWriMo

4am Writer

Today is November 1, which for pantsers everywhere is the official first day of writing 50,000 words. In the words of those who put National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) together: “On November 1, participants begin working towards the goal of writing a 50,000-word novel by 11:59 PM on November 30. Valuing enthusiasm, determination, and a deadline, NaNoWriMo is for anyone who has ever thought about writing a novel.”

blog_nanowrimo

Sure, I value enthusiasm, determination, and deadlines, making me susceptible (once again) to the craze that I’ve been reading about on writing sites and blogs everywhere.

I participated in NaNoWriMo thrice before, in ’10, ’11 and ’12, and all times I’d created novels that wouldn’t otherwise exist if not for this organization. Yes, I have found value and success and hope in the NaNoWriMo experience.

Last week I mentioned that I was in the middle of three various novels, all at different stages, so…

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Happy Halloween!

Greetings All!

I haven’t blog posted in so long! I apologize for that. With my mundane job and writing, I haven’t  had a lot of post time. Regardless, I hate that it’s been so long.

I want to wish you a safe and happy Halloween.

And to those who observe, Blessed Samhain.  )O(

Why Does My Briefcase Matter?

WHY DOES MY BRIEFCASE MATTER?: A Question of Class.

So. Here’s something regarding the subject of discrimination, prejudice or judgement that you won’t see every day. 

Why do some people regard me differently when I carry a briefcase (aka: my laptop in a laptop case) to work and back? 

You might be wondering why I am bringing this up? Well because there’s been so much in the news about different types of discrimination or prejudice and how one person allegedly views another for various, and sometimes odd, reasons.

I wear blue jeans and tennis shoes to work everyday. I usually just wear a colored pullover shirt…like a t-shirt, and often wear logo t-shirts on Fridays.

For the particular position I have now, I do not dress up. I do not wear slacks. I do not wear dresses or skirts. I do not wear dress shoes. And I very rarely wear makeup – mostly because in the summer my building is too damn hot to cake that shit up on my face.

Despite that I dress this way, people seemingly treat me differently when I carry a laptop. For instance, on the days that I carry a laptop/briefcase, some people waiting for, or in the elevator, wearing dresses and suits who also carry briefcases, or laptop cases, and other such bags used to carry paperwork and files, look at me and smile or make small talk. Especially men! On the days that I don’t carry said case, and might just carry my bag with my lunch in it or other personal items, they ignore me. Now why is that?

I’ll tell you why that is. It’s called class division or separation. And when they ignore me, it’s quiet discrimination. For some reason, humans eye each other trying to glean information about one another. Said info is often incorrect. We view each other in particular ways. We focus on something, something that we believe defines a person and we run with it. On the days I have a briefcase or laptop case, I am important. I’m as important as the lawyers on the upper floors. Or the people who work on that floor where that very important person’s office is located – despite the fact that we all work for that main important guy. Then on the days I don’t carry a case, the same type of people don’t regard me at all, and don’t want to. Why does my laptop, or the carrying case, define me?

It’s some kind of trigger, you see. To see someone carry this type case, such as a laptop case, briefcase, or a document bag says to some people that you are well educated, employed, well paid, and that you are of a higher class than people that don’t carry these types of things. And if you have to carry these things while in a suit, you’re even higher class than the others who don’t wear suits.

I find a problem with this since I know many people that go to work everyday empty handed, wearing blue jeans, holey t-shirts and flip-flops, and they get paid double…even triple…what I do. And I know plenty of people who run off to work everyday with a case, such as a briefcase, and get paid less than I do and they have to buy their suits at places where clothes are so costly that I wouldn’t buy a pair of socks there. Oh, the vanity. We must keep up appearances.

I’m a writer. A self-published author. And I’m broke. My briefcase, or laptop case means nothing when it comes to my class status. Yes, I have a higher education. Yes, I have an okay paying public-service job. But I am really nobody outside of what I author. And my briefcase will never make me somebody.

I know that perhaps this is an odd thing for me to notice. And maybe an even stranger thing for me to blog about. But it’s bothered me for some time, so much that I felt I had to talk about it. 

Briefcase, laptop case, document case: An old-time class divider seen through new eyes.

Thanks for reading.

Your Writing is not Your Trash

4am Writer

This is a follow-up post to What do you do with your stories when you’re not feeling it?, which I wrote because I think that far too many people judge their work too soon or too unfairly.

When I finally stopped throwing away my writing, something strange brewed inside me.

don't throw away your writing, dangerous path that can lead to quitting image courtesy of continentalcarbonic.com

 

Now, I am less fearful when I approach the page. I am more of a risk-taker when it comes to writing stories, articles, even blog posts. If I don’t like what I wrote, it’s not the end of my journey, and I can store it for a rainy day.

I think that throwing my work away gave me the subconscious message that I am a failure, that I’m basically killing trees and wasting ink for a no-good, nothing, nowhere dream.

Now that I  simply tuck away something that isn’t working, like down comforters in the…

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